ReBlog – How To Use Foreshadowing As A Writing Tool: Part Two

ReBlog – I still need to work on this. Mine is being read wrong.

By Terry Odell

This is the second of a two part article about foreshadowing. If you missed Part One, you can find it here. With­out proper fore­shad­ow­ing, what you’ve got is a deus ex machina. A magical event that appears, implausibly, out of nowhere.

In Lee Child’s Gone Tomorrow, I’m impressed by how he uses every detail. When a fellow passenger rambles on about the different kinds of subway cars in New York, it’s not idle conversation. That tidbit shows up front and center later on. And even the little things, that might not be plot points, such as the origin of the use of “Hello” to answer the phone will appear, letting the reader know that the character was paying attention, too.

Source: How To Use Foreshadowing As A Writing Tool: Part Two | Kobo Writing Life

ReBlog – How To Use Foreshadowing As A Writing Tool: Part One

ReBlog – I’m trying to use foreshadowing. Trying.

By Terry Odell

When you write, you’re likely to be throwing a lot of obstacles in the paths of your characters. You’ll be giving them skills to solve their problems. Whether or not your readers will believe what they’re reading depends, to a great deal, on proper foreshadowing. Without proper foreshadowing, what you’ve got is a deus ex machina. A magical event that appears, implausibly, out of nowhere.

Prepare the reader. Johnny Carson said, “If they buy the premise, they’ll buy the bit.” So, you have to sell the premise early on. You can’t stop to explain a skill set at the height of the action. You have to show the character using those skills (or fears) early on, in a ‘normal’ setting.

Source: How To Use Foreshadowing As A Writing Tool: Part One | Kobo Writing Life